The history of the corset is more complicated than you think.

Every morning, before wearing work clothes, Sarah Woodyard put on a corset. As Milliner and Mantua-Maker in Colonial Williamsburg, wearing a historically accurate corset is part of Woodyard’s work, where she spends a day educating visitors about the life of the American colonies. The corset she wore was different: on some days, she wore an 18th-century accommodation; on other people, she chose a cordless corset about 1800. Either way, the corset is an important part of her work uniform. Although Woodyard can be on cotton metal or bone for up to 18 hours, she didn’t complain: “[Wearing a corset] is like you are gently holding and hugging for a whole day,” Woodyard told me. .
The corset is one of the most misunderstood costumes in fashion history. For fashion revisionists, this is a simple goal: to remove from the once decorated body, the stiff structure of the corset, and the unforgivable grill skeleton, which looks like a medieval torture device: rough But effective.

“It’s going to be a terrible thing to wear it every day. It’s like living in a cage,” says Zoe Helen, the cultural activist and founder of the cosmic sister. She is a female collective that promotes gender equality. . “[The corset] is definitely a return for women. There is no doubt in my mind, if you have doubts, you have not worn enough time,” Hailin said.

But according to Woodyard, a person wearing a corset, most of the time, a corset all day is supportive, allowing women to perform housework without back pain. “I found that they often helped my day. And the back support really helped me without pain at the end of the day. I did the laundry and cooking in the eighteenth century. When you had to pick up a heavy bucket, or bend And when moving heavy objects [support of the corset] is really helpful, “Woodyard told me.

But is the corset not very uncomfortable or even painful, and the squeezing organs will be forgotten? “I don’t think many people realize that the 18th century manufacturers… [make women] a person who is suitable for [their customers] and is very suitable for them,” Ms. Woodyard said. . “So I often fit the tight words and should install the pillars, but they shouldn’t be tight. If they are too tight, then you need to fix them.”
In addition to fit, tight or somewhere in between – tights have a long history and far exceed our current assumptions. When Minos women in Crete bind their breasts with a soft leather called apodesmos, they can be extended to ancient times by using underwear to manipulate the body. However, with apodesmos, the body still plays an important role in shaping the clothes that wrap it around. It was not until the Middle Ages that the human body was considered an object that needed to be occluded or changed. As the French historian Georges Duby wrote in his book “L’Europe au Moyen Age”, the decorations and decorations associated with that era “masked the body and wrapped it in an unreality.” In the middle, it masks the characteristics of men and women.”

The origin of the word “bobs” that describes the fit of women’s underwear is vague. According to Dr. Joan Evans’s book “Fashion in Underwear: From Babylon to Bikini Briefs”, in the Middle Ages, the term ironically expressed some kind of cloak for men. Until the turn of the 19th century, “bobs” were used to describe controversial underwear (it was called “stay”). Still, the earliest corsets were not even underwear. Originally in the 13th century, it described a soft, fitted bodice that was clipped around the waist and worn on linen. This basic form is used as a blueprint for shaping the body of Western women, with different versions of corsets from centuries, from the stiff accommodations of the eighteenth century to the corsets that exist today.

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