‘Interesting girl’ offers more comedy than life in the play center

The “funny girl” is a big musical. This huge performance (now performed at The Players Center for Performing Center) has made a big deal in two small stories: a woman desperately enters the show business, tells the story of the same woman, and she finds love And then lose it.

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Fanny Bryce is the woman’s name. She is a comedian and one of the top stars in the United States in the 1920s and 1930s. Bryce did a great job and broke all the rules of female celebrities. She did not hesitate to Jews and never tried to cover her origins. Her Rubenesque physique surpassed the slimming standards of feminine beauty in the Jazz era. She did not wear a corsets wholesale but instead used her size to open a joke.

Bryce is not a lady, polite or elegant. But she is very humorous. This is enough to make her a star and make her rich.

The “funny girl” is a love letter to Bliss. She is the central figure of the musical – in a sense, the saint is the core figure of the medieval idol.

Bryce is even greater than life; smaller folks surround her like small satellites. They are very funny and very nice to draw. But they are stock types that aim to reflect the glory of St.Bris.

Director Helen Hollyday swims with counter-current materials. She tried to find the real revelation of other roles than Fanny Bryce. When something is available, she occasionally succeeds. But most of the musical revolves around Bryce. Holliday expressed his agreement. She has been focusing on Bryce’s story and turning it into a story of women empowerment.

Samuels is an outstanding Bryce. This is a sweet characterization, there is no trace of used Streisand. Her shyness and bold comedy reactions reminded me of Ellie Kemper’s character in “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Samuel’s sweetness also filled me with cognitive dissonance. She was at the Venetian Theatre as “Venus at Venus in fur “shows her range.”

Samuels was particularly entertaining in the figures that “his love made me beautiful.” She destroyed the sentimentality of Flozigerfeld with a brazen smile.

The huge ensemble shows a strong representation of the character. Outstanding performances include Christopher Kehoe’s, who is Bryce’s sharp-spoken husband Niki Arnstein (lucky love, unfortunately in gambling); Eddie of Patrick Tancey, assistant of Brice and Dance instructors, providing torches for comedians; and André Keddell as Rose, Brides’ playful mother. Keddell’s portrayal shows your status as one of America’s favorite “funny girls.”

Both technical and creative elements come together. Brian Finetti’s choreography has never been disappointing. Under the guidance of Michelle Neil’s music, the brass band performed the classic songs of the musical with charm. The smart collection of Michael Newton Brown is primarily a wheel – a variety of movable ladders and columns that can become anything. Tim Beltley’s costumes cleverly evoked this era without making actors look like over-models.

This is a lot of talented people. The form they created was still a one-sided portrait of St. Blaise. The creator of this musical (Jule Styne composer, lyricist Bob Merrill and playwright Isobel Lennart) obviously thinks so. Their music feels like a substitute for wish.

To this end, they simplified the details of Brice’s life. This part is to make a neat plot arc, but also to make her love story more delicious. In reality, Arnstein is obviously a bigger heel; he spent 14 months at Leavenworth, after which he hasn’t even seen Bryce.

The bottom line?

Despite flaws, “funny girls” are still the next best thing for Ziegfeld Follies. After all, this is an illusion, not a realistic biography. Samuels provided star performances as Bryce.

So forget the facts and the small players. The most important thing is to forget Barbra Streisand’s movie and accept another method of The Players.

You will definitely have a good time.

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