Artist Spotlight: Claire Bowman

Claire Bowman, a junior art major, recently sat down with Flyer News and revealed the secret behind her art, becoming the significance of feminist artists and the influence behind her work.

Bowman’s inspiration came from the early days because her parents Steve Bowman and Dean Bowman were both artists. Prior to graduating from Dayton University in 1983, Luan was a graphic design professional and Steve was a fine arts major in painting.

Bowman said that growing up in an artistic family she has always been her main source of inspiration.

Bowman said: “When I grow up, I will not be influenced by art.

Her first experience in creating her own artwork was to begin experimenting with acrylic, petroleum, charcoal, and graphite media in high school art classes. However, she began to discover that she was an artist in high school and she accepted AP art.

“I must choose my theme and my path,” recalls Bowman. “As long as it has a unified theme, I can do anything… I had some good things in my senior year.”

Since then, Bowman has grown into a person, an artist, her life and work that affect each other.

When asked what she thinks of her personality as an artist, Bowman expresses how her style fluctuates between harshness and gentleness, and the importance of intelligence elements in her work.

“I tend to be bolder,” Bowman said. “I like to be rude in my art. I used a lot of swear words in my art. But other times I like elegance and exquisiteness. Overall, I think the most important topic in my work is intelligence. Because I really like to think about what I want to say. ”

The two photographs are part of Bowman’s advanced thesis project and are related to the corset. In the photo, Lauren Murray, a primary nutrition student at UD and Diane Baumann, is depicted as being closed off in some way by a bodice. Bowman describes how to use a corset in her work to convey the current world of women to society. Bondage

“They represent… I think how to turn feminism into a visual form,” Claire said. “The two pictures [intentionally drawn here] specifically relate to how the corset had previously restricted and restricted the female body’s physical synchronization, which would hurt it.

Although we do not have a wholesale corsets today, many of these same ideas still exist – they are all spiritual.

I want to convey the idea of ​​a spiritual corset, where a woman is blocked by social expectations and may cause real bodily harm to her psychology or the interaction with her body. “

The other two works in her high-level project come from a series of works called “Civil War.”

Bowman explained that these works are related to fighting women against their own bodies.

“The use of the pages is Italian prints. The quotes in the book are about the war. They only relate the idea of ​​body imagery to the potential fight between what you see and what you think you should see,” Bowman said.

“Then I took another more photo called “The quickest way to end the war was failure.” The title was based on George Orwell’s article “An Elephant Shooting.” This is a self-portrait. I actually deprived the body. Bowman said that only when you want to think about this from a more external point of view, you want to tear up something that is very internal to you… This The idea is very strange.

Bowman said that for her next project, she plans to produce a series of works. She copied her “Civil War” sketch to the wood version in an embossed form.

She explained that women struggle with their own body is the concept she is currently adhering to.

“The whole idea of ​​connecting mind and body, and the violence that you want to destroy yourself – this is where I am now,” said Claire.

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